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Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)
the decision to close the c.i.a. annex, the c.i.a. operation in benghazi, was made early morning hours of september 12 about eight or nine hours after the first wave of the attacks hit the night before. fox was told the c.i.a. site was sanitized so that all of the classified material, the classified equipment, was either destroyed or removed in a 12-hour window and we asked the lawmakers about this. they have not wanted to discuss it on camera but they are indicating this shows you where a lot of the focus was in those hours after the attack, very much on the annex and c.i.a. operation. >>trace: thank you, catherine, from capitol hill. the sea port strike that cost southern californian estimated $1 billion a day is over. workers at the ports of los angeles and long beach walked off the job a week ago and many cargo ships had to change course or simply line up until the ports re-open. for retailers this could not have come as a worse time because they rely on this sea port for a holiday good like clothing and if unture and electronics. both now have struck a deal. adam is like at the po
for "the hurt locker," takes us inside the black sites an detention centers and the cia offices where military contractors and intelligence operatives battled to extract the information that would find bin laden. bigelow is so focused on authenticity that the film fungss in an element documentary-like style as she underdramatizes this dramatic story. it's stripped of hollywood schmaltz or over stylization to tell this important narrative in a harrowing way. we watched waterboarding and bloody men dragged across boards in dog collars and it forces to you reconfront your beliefs about torture. i have always been steadfastly against torture as if felt like nothing less than compromising the american soul and giving our enemies in al qaeda a gift they could use to inspire and recruit and pragmatically we know little to know actionable intelligence came to torture. detective work and treating detainees with respect is more effective but as i watch contractors beat our enemies to a pulp, i wondered if i were in their boots during that time of war charged with making radicalized men talk on
points. officials tell the journal the cia made the call to remove the al qaeda references. why? to protect intelligence sources. according to the reporting of the journal, the fbi agreed with that decision but some state department officials said it made the talking points too vegas. now fox news has learned the director of national intelligence plans to give a classified briefing on benghazi tomorrow for the entire house of representatives. for the rest of the story, catherine herridge with us from washington now. catherine? >> shepard, tomorrow on capitol hill, a second round of closed classified briefings for all the members of the house of representatives, nation's top intelligence officer among others. lawmakers want more definitive information on the level of premeditation by the terrorists and how early it was known. >> the question is how much planning went into this? was it months in the works? was it cobbled together quickly within a matter of a few hours? it makes a great difference in terms of the responsibility as well as the vulnerability of our facilities elsewhe
's based on the story of a real-life c.i.a. agent who successfully tracked down the world's most wanted terrorist. there appears to be drama about the same spy off-screen as well. according to the "washington post," the unidentified operative was passed over for a big promotion, after the raid. and has ad argued with her colleagues over credit for the mission. so dan, a the movie premiers next week. but the woman is the central figure and hailed as the central figure because she pushed over and over for a year saying it's the curious that will lead us for bin laden. she is causing a bit of a stir because i guess she didn't get this promotion and hit replay all to e-mail announcement of the award that everyone is getting, she got one say, saying you tried to obstruct me, you fought me, only i deserve the award. maybe not good to shoot inside the tent in this one? >> bob: i thought the courier thing was george bush intelligence operation. >> andrea: is your name dana? >> bob: sorry. >> dana: it's okay. when i read about this today this is the first time i heard about her. it's hard for me
questions as well. i would point to the issue over the cia talking points and these decisions to make changes that critics say really minimize the role of al qaeda and affiliated groups in this attack, martha. martha: certainly got the right people in the room to answer a lot of those questions. we'll see if they get anywhere conclusive today. you know one of the big issues that has been raised by all of this of course, catherine, is our intelligence on the ground in benghazi. what are we learning about the future of that annex and our presence there? >> reporter: fox news has learned that the decision to close the cia annex and to destroy all of the classified information and move out the classified communications equipment came within 12 hours, 12 hours of the at dark -- attack on the consulate itself and early morning september 12th, by 8:00 local time, effectively the cia operation in benghazi was shuttered. all the classified information was moved or burned as well as the equipment and this was a decision fox was told was made on the ground. then there was notification to washing
in the world. our cia are out there all over the world but they have to get information. they collect it and analyze it. look at what happened in benghazi. that's another issue. we knew that it was a hot spot, but we didn't have intelligence that they were going to attack. >> greta: therein proves my point. that was another intelligence where we might have the hardest working people in the world, the best in the world but the fact is intelligence failures do happen with even the best. that's why it's very hard to have a lot of sort of comfort in terms of what happens with these, you know, chemical weapons should assad leave. >> no question. >> greta: mistakes happen. >> we can't be the sheriff for the whole world, so we have to work with other countries an other allies. as serious as the situation is in syria, we've got to work with russia. >> greta: let me ask you a quick question. you've actually met president assad. tell me your impression. >> on our way to iraq we had to go -- we were asked to go and stop by to see assad. this was right after, maybe six months after president obam
to mexico. >>> now for the complicated life of a cia official who tracked down osama bin laden. there's a reported backlash. according to the washington post the undercover operative who tracked osama bin laden has been passed over for a promotion. the newspaper reports that she sent e-mails to colleagues saying they didn't deserve to share any credit and she is being investigated for her contact with the film makers. >>> from the battle inside the cia to the seemingly never ending battle over obesity. after 30 years of children getting fatter obesity rates are starting to go down. big cities like new york and nebraska reported small drops in childhood obesity rates. that is according to the robert wood johnson foundation. experts say it is the first sign that childhood obesity can be reversing. the 2012 america's health rankings find americans are living longer thanks to medical is hoping a multi-year deal with beyonce estimated to be worth $50 million, you could buy a lot of baby cloefts, her face will be found on limited edition pepsi cans starting early next year. is it just me or
evidence that some of the shoulder-fired missiles that the c.i.a. was trying to track down in libya, and f-16's may have migrated to syria bringing down a helicopter and fighter jet last week. reports that save gas has been loaded on to canisters, the united states set up a task force at a base north of jordan, in amman, that included 150 special forces working with the military of jordan to secure assad's chemical weapons. >> the world is watching. the president of the united states has made very clear there will be consequences if the assad regime makes a tell mistake by using the chemical weapons on their own people. >>reporter: the pentagon is aware a meeting of rebel groups elected a 30-member military command structure and two-thirds is made up with ties to the muslim brotherhood. >>shepard: and damascus and the airport is in the middle of a war zone. fighters declared the airport is "a legitimate target, approach at your own risk." grueling battles today on streets of the capital city. this video showing someone trying to put at the flames which engulfed the car. fox cannot confirm
, una duningÚn cia anÓnima llevo a autoridad hasta el pasaje subterrÁneo, en una planta purificadora de agua, varios fueron arrestados, tenÍan instrumentose de excavaciÓn, y marihuana, fueron puestos en manos de la ley. otra que enfrentarÍa el peso de la ley, una bailarina exÓtica de 20 aÑos, se decidiÓ desnudar en el metro de mÉxico para grabar un video musical, como en el lugar habÍa niÑos, pararia en la calcer por exhibicionismo, el video le dio la vuelta al mundo, fue visto por cientos de miles de personas. y una primeriza viviÓ una amarga experiencia al dar a luz en el hospital de minnesota se equivocaron y llevaron al reciÉn nacido al cuarto de otra madre para que lo amamantarÁn, la mujer se dio cuenta, las progenitoras fueron expuestas a pruebas de sida y hepatitis y por un aÑo mÁs por prevenciÓn. esta nota dirigida a solteras que nos estÉn viendo, y andan en busca de fortuna y amor un millonario colocÓ una valla en san diego california, pidiendo un regalo especial para la navidad, nada menos que una novia latina, aunque algunos creen que es ridÍculo el sueÑo n
. "outfront" tonight, national security contributor fran townsend who is on the cia and homeland security external advisory board and noah shachtman. noah, what do we think is going on right now? at what point are they in this process? >> so the assad regime has hundreds of metric tons of the building blocks of sarin. basically two big building blocks. there's isopropanol which is rubbing alcohol and phosphorous compounds. those are kept separately in order to keep things safe. but the assad regime in small, limited quantities appears to have combined those two chemicals to make deadly sarin nerve agent and has loaded them on to aerial bombs. >> if that is true, fran, it's a very provocative thing. is it provocative enough that the u.s. now has to consider action? >> well, you know, the administration has not made it clear. what the president has said is that the use of such weapons would be a red line for the united states and her allies. but it's not clear, short of use, is this preparation, is the mixing of the precursor chemicals enough? as noah can tell you this is a very unstable su
with its cia . get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right after they get married, they'll find some retirement people who are paid on salary, not commission. they'll get straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. customer erin swenson bought from us online today. so, i'm happy. sales go up... i'm happy. it went out today... i'm happy. what if she's not home? (together) she won't be happy. use ups! she can get a text alert, reroute... even reschedule her package. it's ups my choice. are you happy? i'm happy. i'm happy. i'm happy. i'm happy. i'm happy. happy. happy. happy. happy. (together) happy. i love logistics. >>> when you're speculating in biotech plans, what we care about more than anything else is data. specifically data from clinical trial results. that's why we love biotech conferences. right now we're right smack in the middle o
? the white house, the cia? rice herself. today in a tv interview president obama pointed fingers at us. >> republicans attacks against un ambassador susan rice boxed you in a corner, would it look like a sign of weakness if you didn't appoint her to secretary of state? >> i don't really spend a lot of time on, you know, what folks say on cable news programs attacking highly qualified personnel like susan rice. i'm going to make a decision about who is going to be the best secretary of state. > >> greta: you heard right. president obama blaming cable news for the ambassador's problem. what do you think about that? go to gretawire.com. we're back in ninety seconds. impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. ro price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and conside
is to blame for rice's problems? the white house, the cia? rice herself. today in a tv interview president obama pointed fingers at us. >> republicans attacks against un ambassador susan rice boxed you in a corner, would it look like a sign of weakness if you didn't appoint her to secretary of state? >> i don't really spend a lot of time on, you know, what folks say on cable news programs attacking highly qualified personnel like susan rice. i'm going to make a decision about who is going to be the best secretary of state. > >> greta: you heard right. president obama blaming cable news for the ambassador's problem. what do you think about that? go to gretawire.com. i had enough of feeling embarrassed about my skin. [ designer ] enough of just covering up my moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. i decided enough is enough. ♪ [ spa lady ] i started enbrel. it's clinically proven to provide clearer skin. [ rv guy ] enbrel may not work for everyone -- and may not clear you completely, but for many, it gets skin clearer fast, within 2 months, and keeps it clearer up to 9 months. [ male announc
in the cia -- in this case, the culinary institute of america. >> some of these people have been in afghanistan for months or years and, you know, now they are back here in the united states and they are home and they are trying to readjust. >> reporter: everyone here is intent on being as self- sufficient as possible so they can avoid fast food and learn to cook for themselves in a healthier way. >> a lot of their injuries have prevented them from being able to work out and exercise like they used to. >> i served six years in the united states navy didn't know where to go, felt lost and wounded warrior project reached out records travis' injuries ended his naval career, but being here gives him hope. >> being in the military we have all been hurt. you know, you just become friends right away. >> reporter: they sit together for a meal that binds them in a different way. not only in the country's service, but what happens after they have come home. [ applause ] >> whoo! >> reporter: reporting from st. helena, patrick sedillo, cbs 5. >>> coming up in our next half hour, the phone
through what he is going to do with cia director, with national security advisor, if any changes coming there, and maybe by presenting a whole team, including a new defense secretary nominee at the same time. some of the attention from this back and forth in a more partisan sense can be deflected in a more positive direction. >> thank you very much. michael, thanks for giving us real perspective on that op ed from the "new york times". appreciate that vemp. >> thank you, andrea. >>> the music world has suffered a nuj loss overnight. cross border singing sense station jenni rivera died when a small private jet carrying her and members of her entourage crashed in northern mexico. called the diana ross of mexican music, rivera was a hero among latin women and major player in a genre of music dominated by men. not only did she sell more than 20 million records, but her empire included radio and tv. her reality tv show on telemundo's sister network mundoz elhave aed her to millions. she leaves behind five children and two grandchildren. she was only 43 years old. ♪ but some things never ge
was interviewed by the cia when he left syria. now he's pleading for money and weapons from the u.s. so he can lead a brigade of fighters back into syria to secure those sites. alex marquardt, abc news, on the turkey-syria border. >> the major general gave an interview back in september. so several weeks back and says during his time there, we were in a serious discussion about the use of chemical weapons, including how we would use them and in what areas. we discussed this as a last resort. such as if the regime lost control of important areas such as aleppo. so not that we have them, but details have been discussed. >> he's the second in charge. he says that assad's forces are already spraying pesticides and dropping white phosphorous. claims that were also made by the opposition. but the reason the whole world should be concerned about this is because if it gets into the wrong hands, these chemical weapons are so easily transportable. you're thinking hezbollah could get them in their hands and anybody that's friendly with syria at this point. so that is why -- >> again, if you're wondering
the legacy of all of the bureaucrat particular power. >> former cia official says in recent month kim has purging 200 top officials, including powerful generals who had been loyal to his father. >> generals that are being elevated indeed are a bit more hardcore, hardlined than the generals that were originally in place. so if anything it's an indication that north korea is not going to be any more reform-minded under kim jong-unthan his spread says fors. >> in fact, he's a hardliner who got his fingerprints on the 2010 warship by north korea and the shelling of a disputedisland which killed four south koreans, wolf. he's kwn as a pretty bellicose general. >> people are worried about it right now. let's say they develop a missile with a warhead potentially capable of reaching the united states. what are the u.s. capabilities in terms of defending itself against such a missile? >> leon panetta said that the u.s. is very confident if north korea were to launch a missile at the united states, the american military could guard against it. that's a major reason why they are bolstering their pre
, a real-life cia agent. in a life, the "washington post" reports in mavericks got passed over for the promotion after that mission was successful. the key question is is this agent really out of line or was her behavior described entirely differently if she were a man? cheryl: they're cutting the fat from our military, literally. under intense pressure to trim the budget, the army is dismissing a rising number of soldiers who do not need fitness standards drawing from a growing number of troops grappling with obesity. the number of active-duty military personnel deemed obese actually more than tripled. obesity is now the leading cause of ineligibility for people who want to join the army. really fascinating statistics out of the army. using they're very fit, but they have a major issue. dennis: and delta reaching across the pond striking to sta deal for 49% stake in virgin atlantic airways. cheryl: present atlantic ceo will be joining melissa francis and lori rothman as "markets now" continues. dennis: it is now official, think wall street has fiscal cliff fatigue. the dow up
of terrorist ties. phillip mudd, a former cia and fbi counterterrorism official, says there's a huge concern over who to trust with chemical weapons. >> when you've got roughly 10% of the opposition in the. >>>s u.s. government is declaring are terrorist group you're going to be concerned. in any case like this, there's a lot of risk. >> reporter: but mudd says it's still better to train the rebels on how to handle those materials than to do nothing. and leonard specter says the u.s. and its allies are likely screening the individuals who are being trained very carefully, wofrl, at least that's the hope. >> despite all that, there's still a potential for these chemical weapons getting into the wrong hands. despite what the u.s. is trying to do. >> reporter: phillip mudd says if the syrian regime loses control of these weapons, that's a huge worry. if they fall into the hands of others who are not trusted by the u.s. or its allies they could float around the border to iraq or other potentially dangerous places where they don't have control over these things. if assad loses control of these th
of the cia instead. and get this. the reason why he said -- this was a 90-minute conversation he had with fox news national security analyst, kathleen mcfarland who went on ailes' behest to pitch this. petraeus said at the time my wife would divorce me if i decided to run. i love my wife. we have a beautiful house with his and hers bathrooms, believe it or not. i just want to live in it. i've never spent a night in it. >> he was doing other things, i guess. >>> it's also raising an interesting debate. should the head of a news organization be actively involved in recruiting candidates for president? obviously, you know, in this day and age, we know which network leans left, which network leans right. should you be that actively involved to say i will quit to run someone's campaign? it raises an interesting debate and media circles, i think, as well. >> rogers ailes denies this, saying the strategist that went on his behalf to pitch this. that sonny was way out of line. and zero chance he would leave fox. the money was too good. that's what we say about our jobs. >> yes, that's exactly what we
. host: the cia director has to go to the defense secretary and say, this is how want to spend my money? guest: the officer of the director of national intelligence that we have had since 2004 is responsible for negotiating the relationship with the secretary of defense. it is a difficult relationship. the department of defense is always tempted to reach into the intelligence of say, why is there another $2 billion over there? but we squeeze you down a little bit. -- let me squeeze you down a little bit. intelligence says, no, don't do that. guest: would have no added more layers of bureaucracy. -- we have now added more layers of bureaucracy. host: on twitter, remember all of this spending contributes to gdp. cut military spending, and there will be job losses. economic slowdown. guest: every drawdown we have done has involved the decline in employment in the pentagon. in the 1990's, we took a 700,000 people in active duty force. it was bush and clinton who did it. it started under bush in 1989 and. 300,000 civil servants, down from 1 million at the time. if the bulk of the active duty
doctor who was a c.i.a. informant and helped us hunt down osama bin laden? he's reportedly been tortured in a pakinstani prison, according to his brother. back in june, the doctor was sentenced to 33 years behind bars for conspiring against pakistan. now six months into his sentence, is the united states doing enough to secure his release? let's talk to fox news legal analyst, peter johnson, jr. >> he's being left for dead. >> steve: he is? >> he's an honorary american. 3,000 lives, more, on september 11. >> steve: he's being tortured. >> he tried to get bin laden and infiltrated through a dna ruse, hepatitis vaccine. now he's been tortured, burned with cigarettes, according to reports. he's been shocked. he was blindfolded for a year. he had his hands tied behind his back for a year. the state department says we're trying to get him out. we're trying to negotiate a release. there was a bill the defense authorization act of 2013 trying to limit the $800 million going to counter insurgency funds in pakistan and saying, listen, the department of defense has to sign off that they're doing e
, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you could take out, let's say a city like homs, you could take out a third of the city in the first couple of hours. anderson, this is a highly toxic liquid. it's a persistent agent. it's absolutely completely deadly. >> reporter: now, we've heard repeatedly from u.s. administration officials, u.s. president barack obama, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton that the use of chemical weapons in syria was a red line for which syria and the bashar al assad regime would face severe consequences if they ever did cross that red line and utilize chemical weapons against the people of syria. >> and we have no idea what those severe consequences would be, right? >> reporter: that's right, we don't. you know, people speculate that this would mean some type of military intervention, but we also know that a lot of world powers have not wanted to intervene
's keeping his own council abthat. he's alleges got the cia slot to fill as well. there are rumors there may be changes on his national security team. but nobody is being very specific about it at this point. >> shira, just the optics of the gop engaged in -- in a days-long filibuster with regards to susan rice, attacking susan rice for days. is that a fight that they want to pick? >> you'd think they wouldn't want to pick this fight, especially when there are other well-qualified people who want to be secretary of state such as john kerry, the senator of massachusetts, has made no secret at all that this is a position he's wanted far really long time. so you think this would not be a battle the white house would pick. but obviously the president has a lot of loyalty to susan rice. his defense of her a couple weeks ago from the podium was really unique and frankly defensive. so if this is who he wants, he has every right to nominate her and the senate has every right to say no. >> david, before i let you guys get out of here, i had katon dawson on a few minutes ago. saturdays we like to enga
confessed being agents for the cia and the mossad and the mi6. even the public wonders how much time that have during the week for public services. no one believes that. not a single irony and believes that these people who served the revolution in the first decade have completely become counterrevolutionaries. the kite the it is used to instigate and put fear into the heart of the iranian public. the prime minister was chosen by the ayatollah khomeini. is he is not safe and has to appear on show trial and people were capped at ministers have to appear, and i, as a simple iranian citizen, i am totally at their mercy. this is the change which has taken place. >> thanks, ali. emanuel, want to move on to you about the indifference that marina felt during her imprisonment about the outside world and given ali's surveys and that having panels on the human rights record of iran is somewhat of a novelty in washington -- what does that say about what the west is doing? what measures are the united states taking specifically aimed at iran of its human rights record as opposed to poor for rati
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)